A Con­cep­tual Gap Be­tween Art and Busi­ness?

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Session Title:

  • Don't Hate the Business, Become the Business!

Presentation Title:

  • A Con­cep­tual Gap Be­tween Art and Busi­ness?

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Abstract:

  • Panel: DON’T HATE THE BUSINESS: BECOME THE BUSINESS!

    What does the cap­i­tal­i­sa­tion of art mean? Joseph Beuys de­clared that “the si­lence of Mar­cel Duchamp is over­rated.” It is up to us to put value on this si­lence. How can you make art out of the con­ver­gence of the aes­thetic field (and aes­thetic judge­ment) with that of po­lit­i­cal econ­omy?  In the his­tory of art, artists have often ad­dressed this re­la­tion­ship both spec­u­la­tively and crit­i­cally. Andy Warhol went shop­ping. At the same time, the Bea­t­les made their own record label to as­sume full con­trol of the pro­duc­tion process (and al­most went bank­rupt). What seems to be the case is that not only af­fir­ma­tion but also cri­tique of the re­la­tion­ship be­tween art and busi­ness de­vel­ops new kinds of busi­nesses. After all, where would de­sign be with­out avant-garde (and Bauhaus)? Where would fash­ion be with­out punk?  Artists often crit­i­cally in­ter­fere and play with the con­ver­gence and trans­ac­tion be­tween aes­thetic cap­i­tal and fi­nan­cial cap­i­tal. The paper will pre­sent key ex­am­ples of this (from Mar­cel Duchamp to Christophe Bruno), and argue that the best crit­i­cal artists also po­ten­tially pro­pose the best and most in­no­v­a­tive busi­ness mod­els.

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