Look­ing for What Un­der­pins, An Analy­sis of “Bleed­ing Through: Lay­ers of Los An­ge­les” and a New Pro­ject

Symposium:


Session Title:

  • Transmedia Narrative: Modes of Digital Scholarship and Design Across Public Space

Presentation Title:

  • Look­ing for What Un­der­pins, An Analy­sis of “Bleed­ing Through: Lay­ers of Los An­ge­les” and a New Pro­ject

Presenter(s):



Abstract:

  • Panel: Transmedia Narrative: Modes of Digital Scholarship and Design Across Public Space

    Ac­cord­ing to the so­ci­ol­o­gist Henri Lefeb­vre: “So­cial space can­not be ad­e­quately ac­counted for ei­ther by na­ture (cli­mate, site) or by its pre­vi­ous his­tory.” The in­ad­e­quacy of going back through a re­gion or city’s his­tory, to dis­cover its un­der­pin­nings, in order to ex­plain its cur­rent state, is at the heart of Bleed­ing Through: Lay­ers of Los An­ge­les, 1920-1986 (2003), an in­ter­ac­tive DVD-ROM pro­duced at Labyrinth in col­lab­o­ra­tion with Nor­man M. Klein, An­dreas Kratky and my­self as di­rec­tors. With these in­ad­e­qua­cies in mind, I in­tend to un­ravel how Bleed­ing Through tries to re-pre­sent the forces of daily life and the so­cial imag­i­nary that in­flu­enced down­town Los An­ge­les and its nearby neigh­bor­hoods that at one time fed its cen­ter. Ad­di­tion­ally, I will speak about my own per­sonal “dig­i­tal city sym­phony” that I am cur­rently de­vel­op­ing that deals with is­sues of a work­ing class neigh­bor­hood in the San Fran­cisco Bay Area.

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