Art-Sciing: Slippery Terminologies and Language Performances in Art and Science Collaborations

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Symposium:


Session Title:

  • Art-Sciing: Slippery Terminologies and Language Performances in Art and Science Collaborations

Presentation Title:

  • Art-Sciing: Slippery Terminologies and Language Performances in Art and Science Collaborations

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Abstract:

  • Linguistic collisions occur when alien disciplines get acquainted, new meanings appear and misunderstandings occur. In gravitating collaboration towards science and technology, in working with virtual and digital methods, the correspondences in the metaphors of the past need to be analyzed, in nature and tactical media that hold for the collaborative structures of the present. This panel questions which linguistic aspects are embedded in the different perceptions and desires towards interdisciplinary collaboration. Decades of technical driven technology have provided the impression that keyboard produced language with a tech flavor is the most effective, profitable or ultimate way to communicate. We suggest more effective and appealing visual means of communication for interdisciplinary collaborations. But there is more to the influence of technology in the field of electronic media art. Ideally, media artists can engage with scientific practice questioning its premises while reflecting critically one’s own field. Interdisciplinary collaboration often brings about more trouble than insight, for science is often performed in media arts as a legitimizing discourse, rhetoric or a narrative rather than enacted as a critical knowledge. This panel is a critical expose on different cross-disciplinary linguistic aspects in media arts, and art – science collaboration. It deals with the influence caused by technical terminology in the field of the media art vocabulary, the creative or artistic opportunities offered by this linguistic collision and it provides alternative ideas for communication based on art and technology practice. We consider structures and metaphors of communication, with reference to a number of artists’ and others software, including the CodeZebra project.

     

    Full text (PDF) p. 132